Invasion of the Vegetables


After a hiatus of many years, garden mania has once again taken over my soul and my house. Seeds are germinating in my art room while sweet potatoes hide in our coat closet and tomato seedlings await their peat pots on the kitchen counter. These days you’ll find me wandering around with a plant mister and planning charts while checking projected night-time temps on my phone and muttering about frost-free dates in my sleep.

On gusty nights I wake up in a cold sweat wondering how my lettuce starts are faring now that they’re finally hardening off in the unheated greenhouse that tends to lose its panels in a strong wind. I’ve been known to rescue them after dark for an overnight stay in the protection of my house, much like a parent sheltering her young from the blows of life.

Nearly twenty years since my last foray into seed starts and county extension handouts, I’ve found that much has changed with the proliferation of new technology in growing lights and heating mats, but very little in terms of my anxiety and protectiveness toward my “plant” progeny.

And while garden centers and box stores will be full of perfectly potted specimens lined up in pristine rows to pop into soil when the weather finally warms up enough to shed our winter coats, the little farm where I live grows organic with an eye to the unusual and the flavorful, and strongly supports the seed companies that provide ethically obtained, preferably heirloom seeds that are untreated and unsullied by the corruption of corporate tampering.

Besides, that first taste of juicy home-grown heirloom tomato will be well worth the vegetable invasion overtaking my home.

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3 thoughts on “Invasion of the Vegetables

  1. My feelings exactly! I used to get up every two hours during the winter to check the greenhouses. And I’ve attended all the professional growers’ conferences, appalled at the “standard” chemicals we were advised to use. I don’t trust any of them anymore, especially the big box stores. They just want the cheapest, not the properly labeled or properly grown.

  2. What a perfect Easter image! Especially in this season of eternal gloom. It’s lovely to see these little seedlings in their spring green, just popping with new life. A certain obsessiveness is required, for sure. What a garden you will have! That is, if spring blizzards don’t get us. Happy Easter!

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